Fourth Podium Poll for 9/16/2020

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Which of these missed clues did you get?

$800 EUROPEAN HISTORY: Meaning "hammer", it was the byname of Frankish king Charles, who hammered a Muslim army at the 732 Battle of Tours
33
46%
$1000 TV SHOWS BASED ON BOOKS BY WOMEN: Based on novels by Deborah Harkness, "A Discovery of" these beings centers on historian Diana Bishop, who has magical abilities
26
36%
$800 THESE UNITED STATES: Cobblestones are part of the charm of Wharf Street in this Maine city with a name that suggests it's water-adjacent
40
56%
$1000 THESE UNITED STATES: Fargo, N.D. lies in the valley of this "colorful" river "of the North", one of the USA's great agricultural areas
50
69%
$1000 NUMBER, PLEASE: The word myriad can refer to any large number of things, or specifically to this big number (Kelly: What is a million? Alex: No. Kelly: Aww!)
16
22%
$1600 SUMMARIZING THE NOVEL: Here comes the Barnes; where there's a will, there's a Hemingway; Romero the torero (David: What is Death in the Afternoon?)
45
63%
$2000 SUMMARIZING THE NOVEL: Utopia (not!); I ain't goin' nowhere; the Butler did it (in 1872)
27
38%
$800 ACM Awards: The son of country singer Rhett Akins, he was the 2018 winner for Male Artist of the Year
8
11%
$1600 ACM Awards: A nickname for the state of Virginia, this band won Group of the Year in 2019 & Vocal Group of the Year in 2018 (Kelly: Who are Lady Antebellum?)
37
51%
$2000 ACM Awards: New Female Vocalist of the Year for 2015, she literally sparkled at the awards in 2017 when she sang "Yeah Boy"
4
6%
$1200 THE NAVAJO: The Navajo capital shares its name with this rock, a nearby sandstone ridge with a see-through portal
13
18%
$2000 THE NAVAJO: The doors in these traditional dome-shaped Navajo dwellings always face to the east (Cory: What are adobe? Kelly: What are pueblos?)
24
33%
$800 SAND PAINTING: This New Englander known for his stormy seas painted a calmer 1869 "Beach Scene"
41
57%
DD1 EUROPEAN HISTORY: Helped by Lord Byron, in 1830 it became the first of the Ottoman Empire's subject nations to achieve independence
46
64%
DD2 6-LETTER WORDS: Used to indicate whether a substance is acidic or basic, this compound is obtained from lichens
60
83%
DD3 THE NAVAJO: The unique complexities of the Navajo language made it perfect for Native Americans working as these during World War II
60
83%
 
Total votes: 72

davey
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Re: Fourth Podium Poll for 9/16/2020

Post by davey »

I end up with $5600, because I screwed up the Hemingway saying A Farewell to Arms, even though The Sun Also Rises is the only Hemingway novel I've actually read. I've done this before, blanked on that particular title. But since I know I've read it, I can't bear to stay clam, since I should know it, I think it will come to me before time runs out - but instead another title obstructs my way to it. I wouldn't go with Death in the Afternoon, since it's not a novel.
But I got the FJ (knew Crockett died later) and the litmus DD (should have known the Byron, found the Navajo confusing) so I guess I win anyway... :)

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squarekara
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Re: Fourth Podium Poll for 9/16/2020

Post by squarekara »

Never knew "myriad" referred to a specific number.

Leander
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Re: Fourth Podium Poll for 9/16/2020

Post by Leander »

$8000 plus DD 1 & 3.

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Re: Fourth Podium Poll for 9/16/2020

Post by opusthepenguin »

TenPoundHammer wrote:
Thu Sep 17, 2020 12:58 pm
I got The Sun Also Rises, Thomas Rhett, Old Dominion, Kelsea Ballerini, and litmus.
Nice pulls! That gets you $6000, enough to win if you got FJ. But not enough to win with a savvy wager from second if you missed it. My $6400 put me in the same boat, the highest ordinary (divisible by $200) value to be there. We'll go out for drinks later and talk about the various "one thing"s that could've been different to put us in the champ's spot.

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Re: Fourth Podium Poll for 9/16/2020

Post by opusthepenguin »

AFRET CMS wrote:
Thu Sep 17, 2020 2:18 pm
$6200 from TSs, correct on DD2 and DD3. Would have probably still lost when I matched David's answer of Davy Crockett (though I spell it without the "E").
Davy Crocktt? :lol:

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Re: Fourth Podium Poll for 9/16/2020

Post by seaborgium »

squarekara wrote:
Thu Sep 17, 2020 5:27 pm
Never knew "myriad" referred to a specific number.
I actually knew the root before I knew that particular word. My dad had a book (it's still around here somewhere) called The Insomniac's Dictionary that I got into as a kid that had a bunch of stuff about words. One section had a bunch of -ocracy and -archy words that referred to who ruled, and the author had listed a bunch of words that referred to rule by a specific number. The last one, with the highest number, was "myriarchy," defined as rule by 10,000. So when I encountered "myriad" at some later point, I was likely able to glean from context that it referred to a large, uncountable number, but I knew from my prior reading that it probably literally referred to ten thousand.

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squarekara
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Re: Fourth Podium Poll for 9/16/2020

Post by squarekara »

seaborgium wrote:
Thu Sep 17, 2020 8:07 pm
squarekara wrote:
Thu Sep 17, 2020 5:27 pm
Never knew "myriad" referred to a specific number.
I actually knew the root before I knew that particular word. My dad had a book (it's still around here somewhere) called The Insomniac's Dictionary that I got into as a kid that had a bunch of stuff about words.
Well, dang. I'm gonna track down that book and give up the Melatonin.

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ElendilPickle
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Re: Fourth Podium Poll for 9/16/2020

Post by ElendilPickle »

$8400 plus DDs 2 and 3, and I got FJ.

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AFRET CMS
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Re: Fourth Podium Poll for 9/16/2020

Post by AFRET CMS »

opusthepenguin wrote:
Thu Sep 17, 2020 5:41 pm
AFRET CMS wrote:
Thu Sep 17, 2020 2:18 pm
$6200 from TSs, correct on DD2 and DD3. Would have probably still lost when I matched David's answer of Davy Crockett (though I spell it without the "E").
Davy Crocktt? :lol:
Curse you again -- another mouthful of coffee to clean off the monitor.
I'm not the defending Jeopardy! champion. But I have played one on TV.

Plactus
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Re: Fourth Podium Poll for 9/16/2020

Post by Plactus »

Only Red River of the North, myriad = 10,000, and The Sun Also Rises. Gives me $3,600, not within striking distance.

Did get Final and all three DDs.
Oh, what has science wrought? I sought only to turn a man into a metal-encased juggernaut of destruction powered by the unknown properties of a mysterious living crystal. How could this have all gone wrong?

seaborgium
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Re: Fourth Podium Poll for 9/16/2020

Post by seaborgium »

seaborgium wrote:
Thu Sep 17, 2020 8:07 pm
squarekara wrote:
Thu Sep 17, 2020 5:27 pm
Never knew "myriad" referred to a specific number.
I actually knew the root before I knew that particular word. My dad had a book (it's still around here somewhere) called The Insomniac's Dictionary that I got into as a kid that had a bunch of stuff about words. One section had a bunch of -ocracy and -archy words that referred to who ruled, and the author had listed a bunch of words that referred to rule by a specific number. The last one, with the highest number, was "myriarchy," defined as rule by 10,000. So when I encountered "myriad" at some later point, I was likely able to glean from context that it referred to a large, uncountable number, but I knew from my prior reading that it probably literally referred to ten thousand.
I just found the book. It's got (going from high to low) myriarchy, chiliarchy (a thousand), hecatonarchy (a hundred), dodecarchy, decarchy, octarchy, heptarchy, pentarchy, tetrarchy, triarchy, biarchy, and monarchy (with a few alternatives given for several of the lower numbers, and "hecatontarchy"). The author, Paul Hellweg, explained that "hexarchy" already refers to a group of six states rather than to rule by six leaders; he also observed that there didn't seem to have ever been a word for rule by nine. He said he suggested "nonarchy" in a magazine article once, and a reader wrote in saying that that mixed Greek and Latin, and "ennearchy" would be consistently Greek (and that's also where I first learned the Greek "nine" prefix).

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Re: Fourth Podium Poll for 9/16/2020

Post by opusthepenguin »

seaborgium wrote:
Sun Nov 01, 2020 7:38 am
He said he suggested "nonarchy" in a magazine article once, and a reader wrote in saying that that mixed Greek and Latin, and "ennearchy" would be consistently Greek (and that's also where I first learned the Greek "nine" prefix).
You're not supposed to mix Greek and Latin roots in a single word. I learned that on television.

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